Simon Mantel

Simon Mantel faculty member in professional shot in dark suite with US flag
Title:
Faculty Member, Police & Security Studies Program
Email:
[email protected]

Areas of Expertise

  • Criminal Justice
  • Police Science
  • Leadership
  • Transnational Threats
  • Computer Forensics
  • Cyber Crime

Simon Mantel currently serves as the Deputy Director of the Secretary of Defense Communications Office where he oversees the delivery of worldwide, executive level, communications and information services that enable the Secretary of Defense to orchestrate our nation’s defense regardless of location, scenario, mode of transportation, or environment.

Simon has a diverse local and federal law enforcement career specializing in computer forensics, cyber-crime investigations and cyber counterintelligence activities including participation in the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force and U.S. Secret Service Electronic Crimes Task Force.

Earlier in his policing career, he served in a variety of assignments such as patrol, street level narcotics and gang investigations, executive protection, protective intelligence, Counter Assault Team (CAT), and Special Reaction Team (SRT).

Simon is a court qualified expert witness who has presented, published, and appeared in television interviews regarding cyber security and crime related matters. Simon left government service in 2014 to gain private sector experience as the Director of Cyber Investigations and Forensics for a Fortune 300 company before returning to government service in 2017.

Education

  • Associate's degree and Bachelor's degree in Professional Studies majoring in Police Science (summa cum laude), The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
  • Master of Science in Jurisprudence with an Intellectual Property Law concentration, Seton Hall Law School, Newark, N.J.
  • Senior Executive Fellows program, John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University

Distinctions

  • Recipient of the Dr. Richard Southby Police Science Prize, George Washington University

Classes Taught

CPS 2173: Transnational Threats and Security